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the story of the civil war at sea and on the rivers, jim, you were putting the finishing touches on your new book. craig, you were preparing four book for publication as well, and now both dish have to do this the way they do on the talk shows -- so, now, james mcpherson's war on the waters, the union and confederate navies, 1861 to 1865, and craig's civil war at sea, both very handsomely done, and it's good because we get to resume our conversation. we barely broke the surface. let's get right to it. because we spoke for an hour last time and we got to about january of 1862. so i'll assume you all know about 1861. and get to something that jim pointed out in his book, which i found rather interesting, and that is that 150 years ago this month, eye side from all the other things going on, including the first shudders of the realization that lincoln had actually promulgated an emancipation proclaimation. the blockade was in force in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers s
some people i admire including if senator jim buckley. he deserve a round of applause. let us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became in bill buckley's words, the most important american defector from communism. and its treasonous adherents, continued in august of 1948 when he identified alger hiss, a golden boy of the liberal establishment as a fellow member of his underground communist cell in the 1930s. this was a former assistant of the secretary of state and adviser to of franklin d. roosevelt, acting secretary-general of united nations' founding conference in san francisco and recently named president of the carnegie endowment for national peace. he emphatically denied chambers's allegation. a great deal more than the reputations of these two men was at stake. if this was innocent, anti communism, and those closely associated with the like richard nixon. it was dealt a devastating blow. if alger hiss was guilty, anti communism would occupy a prominent part of the political landscape, and his spokesman would become national leaders
's confronted with the question by jim on the evening news and asked about the scandal and he said there is no sexual relationship. he's weak, he's vacillating and using the present tense verb. everyone gets worried at that point. then hilary once again steps in and goes on the "today" shows and says is part of a vast right-wing conspiracy. it is. but it's more than that. she stiffen his spine basically puts him in a position of outright denial and for six months he's successful and he basically buys time and the american people become more comfortable to the idea of a president who may have actually done this. when finally he has a testify before a federal grand jury, quote, unquote unappropriate relationship. hilary had to make a final decision of her life as to whether to rescue him again. he told her, yes i did have a relationship with her. and it was a terrible thing i did, and he asked for forgiveness. for the last time she saidly standby you. ly stick by you. i will not abandon you. that is pivotal. that is pivotal. it's a moment in time when a number of senators, democrat a
, were penetrating in 1995 and 1994 into the soils. he went back to vietnam with his son jim who's one of the proponents of the mission. he was the highest ranking military figure to return to vietnam at that time. and he was a leader in convincing president clinton to open, to normalize relations with vietnam. and that's another interesting -- and, actually, president clinton asked him to get general westmoreland onboard on all this. and bud played a very central role in getting general westmoreland to recognize the importance of opening up a relationship with vietnam. and so the watch really never ended for bud. and that's why in 1998 the president of the united states, bill clinton, would give him the presidential medal of freedom for everything he had done on behalf of generations of people. he never stopped fighting, as president clinton said. never stopped fighting for those who had no power. so my book is not so much a story about his different commands, and it's not an official naval history. i leave that to the next generation of naval historians who will have is the access to
constant in 1921, whom jim spoke about in his introduction, and later when dorothy was the chief of the bureau in berlin was as courageous as her american trend, possibly more so spirits intent on breaking through that concrete ceiling of male dominated the literature and journalism they both were intent on confronting the pivotal issues of their time head-on, and they would remain friends of their lives. it was as humble as a beginning as dorothy. she was born sicily isabel on the a outskirts of london in 18922 space thailand mother with musical aspirations in a truly gifted journalist father when she abandoned them to poverty. she was both devastated and in the liberated. as angry as she was, she liked thompson was able to convince herself. naughty and rebellious ms. fairfield first tried to be an actress which was a terrible thing for a respectable woman to do but early on, she realized that her true passion and the devotee was the spoken word coming and she became a feminist journalist as a tool for initiating social change. by the age of 20, she had earned a reputation as a
if he is here. there you are. jim dudek is the exception to every i'm saying tonight about generals by the way. a couple of things about jim dudek district may, now retired the only channel i know who upon retirement wrote in a phd program in john hopkinson philosophy, which is an interesting career move. but in review of my manuscript cecchini to think more in the role of civilians and he was totally right and in the rewrite, this became a major theme. both works, what doesn't work? marshland was developed as a model is good relations, good discourse. not particularly friendly. >> eisai marshal refuse to dinner. >> refuse to laugh at his jokes come when fdr refers to miss church coming he makes it clear his name is general marshall and the first time marshall ever went to hyde park, roosevelts home, was for his hero to be a pallbearer. he kept his distance commedia was selected for the job because he was candid with roosevelt. before army chief of staff, brigadier in the oval office and basically roosevelt was was a month since his fate a minute, unique to hear me out here. he deci
and choice and possibility and sacrifice. so wonder if you could go back. i know you were in the jim crow south in baker county, in georgia and you were daddy's girl. and trying to get all gangster driving the tractor at 4 years old and in the streets and neighborhood. tell us about that. >> well, you know, we were in baker county, out, you hear about, you read about some of the i have haves of earlier years but the gator and the sheriff in our county wanted to be known as the gator. the gator actually ruled every thing, everyone in the county. you can't imagine looking at the western from earlier days anyone like him but he was worse than what you have seen in your worst western. but growing up in that we, my family lived, my great-great grandparents had come to baker county. i don't know whether they came as slaves or not but i know they end up there as share croppers and with the up tent on buying land and that they did. they bought enough land that the area where i grew up was still today called hawkins town and lots of family. but it was that way, you know, the hawkins lived in one a
are our congressman, jim mcgovern, also mary beth mcmahon, senior vice president of special olympics massachusetts, virginia swain, returned peace corps volunteer coordinator and kathy fielder, representing holy cross. to you special guests and to everyone, a warm welcome. we also need to note the absence of a holy cross junior, ken jordan, head of the local chapter of the knights of columbus, whose brother died in an auto accident two days ago. ken and his fellow knights have put forth great effort to publicize this evening's event, and ken had been anticipating it eagerly. this evening it's a particular pleasure to welcome mark back to his alma mater. he took several courses with me during his student days, but our relationship wasn't completely academic. through the generosity of mark's father, i was able to accompany him and one of his classmates in travels through poland and the soviet union in the summer of 1985, the summer before their senior year. and on that first day in leningrad -- now st. petersburg -- mark, always his father's son, asked if we could celebrate daily mass
ellie and i happened to hail from position, the council of foreign relations that whittaker jim snow that would've seen at a hotbed of pinko commie sense but nevertheless the world changes. when i think of tonight, but i think about it is, when i think of it i think not just of the fact that it is a document of great little repower, which, of course, it is and is part of its appeal, but also the fact that it was this very potent weapon in this ideological battle against communism. that was raging when it came after it was not a weapon that was designed, funded or created by the u.s. government but nevertheless it became a very powerful instrument of warfare against the appeal of communism. and i'm sure and not deleted millions of people in the united states and no doubt around the world to the appeal of communism and revealed its true face, which the communist hierarchy did so much to keep hidden. there was of course a much larger war, ideological work on what i think more accurately can be called political war being waged by the u.s. government and by a lot of individuals, including
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9